Monday, March 2, 2009

What have I done??

As is quite evident, I've switched templates. Much like starting a brand new garden, things will be dirty around here until I get all the plants arranged like I want them. I'm not even sure this landscape design will be my final choice.

Nevertheless, right now I need to post something related to gardening so there's no ignorant ads.

On my Facebook status for yesterday I wrote: "Extra food miles driven just to buy organic negates the overall benefit." This brought a bevy of replies, which was good. Without goin into it too much, simply because it's my article for Wednesday's paper, it has to do with the choices we make and how organic gardening/farming sometimes appears to be used as a status symbol.

So, I pose the question to you: When you must drive an extra 20 miles or so (or do most of your organic supply shopping online) in order to purchase organic gardening products, does the added cost of gasoline (CO2 emissions, etc.) and shipping and handling fees (trucking and/or flying miles), cancell out the benefits of environmentally sound (i.e., organic) gardening/farming practices? And please justify your answer with sound reasoning and do provide examples from personal experience.

Also, don't forget to add a tip or two or three about where to put this or that perennial or annual, or tree or shrub, here in the new landscape. Thanks!

7 comments:

tina said...

I think it looks great TC. I don't drive out of my way for organic food, so I can't help you with that question:)

Dave said...

I generally don't have to drive far to get what I need for the garden, compost. Some I compost in the backyard and the rest I pick up from a supply yard near us. I suspect that even drive 20 miles out of the way is worth it. One trip to pick up compost 20 miles away will last you the season and reduce what you cause the grocery stores to import. I don't know the technical side of it though, I haven't done the math so I could be wrong. The pesticide and fertilizer reduction would be enough for me to consider the CO2 use. Organic gardening is a big package with lots of factors. I think many people think about the CO2 stuff and forget about the other things that organic production is good for.

Jennifer Suarez said...

I love the new look!! How have your ads been doing? They blend in well and look very nice!

Organics I can leave em or take them. They are readily available at our normal grocery store, but they are almost twice the price.

Worth it? Only if I have extra spending money.

Frances said...

Hi TC, looks like you are getting answers from the TN contingent at the moment. I like the new look and as for the tips, well that should be up to you and the way it seems best. I change the location of stuff on my sidebar from time to time, like when I want something to be at the top. That is what most people look at anyway, the top. Put your best foot forward, I say. As for going extra miles to get organic? Like Tina, don't do it. My town is very small. There are only a couple of groceries and the one I go to always has a lot of organic and local stuff marked as such. I will buy that over the stuff from far away every time and most other people here do too. As for finding the most organic to be had, I grow it myself.
Frances

Rob (ourfrenchgarden) said...

Always difficult, reducing the carbon footprint and all that. What to do, so much else to consider. Do we stop buying say Bananas 'cos they've travelled a long way. Do we blank 'Fairtrade' bananas because they may have travelled further?

Rob

walk2write said...

Something weird happened to your site this morning. I tried to leave a comment on your Say Nothin' Saturday post, and an error message from Blogger popped up, and then your site just disappeared! Scary! Your template now looks different than it did this morning. I like the way it looks now, but you do whatever you want. I did notice that your follower list has disappeared. It says you don't have any, and that's not true. I'm one for sure. As for the organic thing, I've been bugging Hubby about growing worms. Their castings are supposed to make the best compost available, and they decompose kitchen scraps much faster than just using bins. It would also be nice to have your own fish bait right at hand.

Susie said...

I hate to admit it but I am not an organic gardener either. So I'm sorry but I can't answer your question either.

But I do like the looks of your new "landscape". So far I'd say the new plants have been placed in the right beds.